Cervical Cancer Vaccine Side Effects

Cervical Cancer Vaccine Side Effects

Cervical cancer vaccine side effects - Vaccines are urgently needed, according to the medical world, but there are some flaws in the vaccine would have been. This time we will discuss the cervical cancer vaccine side effects pregnancy and long term use of the vaccine. Many examples we could give especially in country Australia, Ireland, and India. Describes if the side effects of the vaccine to prevent HPV cervical cancer, the following explanation.

Human papillomavirus (HPV) can cause genital warts, cervical cancer and various forms of vulvar or vaginal cancer. Cervical cancer vaccine side effects - The bivalent form of the HPV vaccine (Cervarix) is used only in females. Other forms of HPV vaccine (GARDASIL) are used in both women and men. This treatment guide provides information only for Cervarix. The HPV bactericidal vaccine (Cervarix) is used for the prevention of cervical cancer caused by certain types of HPV (types 16 and 18) in young girls and women aged between 10 and 25 years. The HPV vaccine can also be used for purposes not listed in this treatment guide.

What are the possible side effects of the vaccine against human papillomavirus (Cervarix)? You should not receive a booster vaccine if you have an allergic reaction that threatens your life after the first photo. Developing HPV cancer is much more dangerous to your health than getting a vaccine to protect it. However, like any other medicine, this vaccine may cause side effects, but the risk of serious side effects is very low.

Get Emergency medical assistance if you have signs of allergic reaction: itching; difficulty breathing; Swelling of the face, lips, tongue or throat. Perhaps you feel faint after receiving this vaccine. Some people experience reactions such as seizures after receiving this vaccine. Your doctor may want you to stay in the first 15 minutes after the injection.

Cervical Cancer Vaccine Side Effects Long Term

Other side effects may include: pain, swelling or redness to which the injection is given; a headache, feeling tired; Joint pain or muscle. Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain; Menstrual pain; Cold or agitated, sore throat or a cough.

What is the most important information I need to know about the vaccine against human papillomavirus (Cervarix)? The bivalent form of the HPV vaccine (Cervarix) is used only in females. Other forms of HPV vaccine (GARDASIL) are used in both women and men. This treatment guide provides information only for Cervarix. You should not receive a booster vaccine if you have an allergic reaction that threatens your life after the first photo.

Before receiving HPV bivalent vaccine, tell your doctor if you have a weakened immune system or if you are allergic to rubber latex. Cervical cancer vaccine side effects - The HPV vaccine should not be used for routine pelvic examinations and for HP cervical cancer screening smears. Perhaps you feel faint after receiving this vaccine. Some people experience reactions such as seizures after receiving this vaccine. Your doctor may want you to stay in the first 15 minutes after the injection. Developing HPV cancer is much more dangerous to your health than getting a vaccine to protect it. However, like any other medicine, this vaccine may cause side effects, but the risk of serious side effects is very low. The HPV vaccine will not protect against sexually transmitted diseases such as chlamydia, gonorrhea, herpes, HIV, syphilis, and trichomoniasis.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before receiving the vaccine against human papillomavirus (Cervarix)? To ensure that you can safely receive this vaccine, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions: a weak immune system; Or if you're allergic to latex rubber.

Category of pregnancy FDA B. This medicine is considered to be harmless to the unborn child. However, you should not receive the HPV vaccine without notifying your doctor if you are pregnant or are planning to get pregnant before receiving all vaccine doses. It is not known whether the HPV vaccine enters breast milk or if it can harm the breastfeeding baby. Do not accept this vaccine without telling your doctor if you are breastfeeding your child. The HPV vaccine will not protect against sexually transmitted diseases such as chlamydia, gonorrhea, herpes, HIV, syphilis, and trichomoniasis. The HPV bivalent vaccine will not prevent diseases caused by HPV types other than types 16 and 18. There are more than 100 different HPV types.

How is the vaccine against human papillomavirus (Cervarix) administered? The HPV vaccine is administered as an injection (injection) to the muscles at the upper arm. You will receive these injections at your doctor's office or other clinical situations. The HPV bivalent vaccine is given in a series of 3 photographs. You may be the first shot at any time, as long as you are between 10 and 25 years of age. Then you will have to receive a second dose one month after the first injection and the third dose of six months after the first injection. Cervical cancer vaccine side effects - Be sure to receive all doses of this vaccine recommended by your healthcare provider or health Department of your state. You may not be fully protected if you do not receive the full series. The HPV vaccine should not be used for routine pelvic examinations and for HP cervical cancer screening smears.

What should I avoid while receiving the human papillomavirus vaccine (Cervarix)? There may be other vaccines not to be administered concomitantly with the HPV vaccine. Until you have performed a series of three HPV vaccine, do not receive any other vaccine (including a flu vaccine) without first requiring your doctor.

What other medicines will affect the human papillomavirus vaccine (Cervarix)? Before receiving the HPV vaccine, tell your doctor about all other vaccines you have recently received. Also, tell your doctor if you have only received medications or treatments that can weaken your immune system, including: An oral drug of steroids, nasal, inhalation or injection; chemotherapy or radiation; Medicines for the treatment of psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, or other autoimmune disorders such as azathioprine (Imuran), efalizumab (Raptiva), etanercept (Enbrel), Leflunomide (Arava), and others; or medicines to treat or prevent the rejection of transplanted organs such as basiliximab (Simulect), Ciclosporin (Sandimmune, Oral, Gengraf), Muromonab-CD3 (Orthoclone), mycophenolate mofetil (CellCept), sirolimus (Rapamune) or Tacrolimus (Prograf).